Conical Intersect / Gordon Matta-Clark & Bruno de Witt / 1975

Conical Intersect / Gordon Matta-Clark & Bruno de Witt / 1975


Footnotes

For this antimonument, or “nonument,” which contemplated the poetics of the civic ruin, Matta-Clark bored a tornado-shaped hole that spiraled back at a 45-degree angle to exit through the roof. Periscopelike, the void offered passersby a view of the buildings’ internal skeletons. ➡︎

The first thing one notices is that violence has been done. Then the violence turns into visual order and, hopefully, then to a sense of heightened awareness.... You see that light enters places it otherwise couldn't. Angles and depths can be perceived where they should have been hidden. Spaces are available to move through that were previously inaccessible.... My hope is that the dynamism of the action can be seen as an alternative vocabulary with which to question the static, inert building environment. ➡︎

The cuts are also about texture: the raw edge of the wall — exposing ripped wallpaper, plaster and stud walls — becomes more important than the finished surfaces. They sensitize the viewer to the world around them, to the structural and social glue that holds disparate elements together. ➡︎


Sources

◼︎ Gordon Matta-Clark, Conical Intersect, 1975 / Guggenheim

◼︎ The Reading Life: Gordon Matta-Clark's 'Conical Intersect' / David L. Ulin / Los Angeles Times / 2011

◼︎ Timely Lessons From a Rebel, Who Often Created by Destroying / Nicolai Ouroussoff / The New York Times / 2007


In Residence: Ruth & Richard Rogers / Matthew Donaldson / NOWNESS / 2013

In Residence: Ruth & Richard Rogers / Matthew Donaldson / NOWNESS / 2013

Richard Rogers on the Pompidou / Dezeen / 2013

Richard Rogers on the Pompidou / Dezeen / 2013