Dodge House 1916 / Esther McCoy & Robert Snyder / 1965

Dodge House 1916 / Esther McCoy & Robert Snyder / 1965


Footnotes

By 1963, the Los Angeles Board of Education declared the Dodge House “surplus” and the County Board of Supervisors re-zoned the area from R-1 to R-4, from single-family homes to apartment buildings. While the street underwent a radical condominium-ization, the Dodge House was slated for the wrecking ball. Unannounced, on a February morning in 1970, the entire property was demolished. A neighbor who witnessed the destruction reported: “I went out in the morning and when I came back two hours later the wrecking crew was there. They beat it and beat it and it wouldn’t go down. It was like an animal being beaten. They kept beating and beating and it finally cracked up. The trees didn’t want to go either but they beat them until by late afternoon everything was gone.” Gill believed that a “house should be simple, plain, and substantial as a boulder.” The Dodge House, with its serenely unadorned surfaces and eight inch thick reinforced concrete walls, was the fulfillment of that vision. Then, in a single day, it was gone forever. ➡︎

Joining a chorus whose voice ultimately was not loud enough to halt change, architect Richard Neutra pleaded at board of education meeting: "The destruction of the house for commercial purposes would not be a passing event; it would become an epic and international scandal." ➡︎


Sources

◼︎ Irving Gill’s Dodge House: a legacy of beauty and invention / Susan Morgan / Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution / 2012

◼︎ Dodge House in West Hollywood: All that's left is the architect's genius and a cautionary tale / Jeffrey Head / Los Angeles Times / 2011


Night and Day, DTLA with Stevie Williams / Ryan Allan / 2017

Night and Day, DTLA with Stevie Williams / Ryan Allan / 2017

AD Visits: Patrick Dempsey at His Malibu Home / Architectural Digest / 2014

AD Visits: Patrick Dempsey at His Malibu Home / Architectural Digest / 2014