House Tour: The Antivilla / Marcus Gaab / The New York Times / 2016

House Tour: The Antivilla / Marcus Gaab / The New York Times / 2016


Footnotes

The Antivilla began its life as part of a state-run underwear factory complex in the 1980s. When Brandlhuber bought it in 2012 as his weekend home, he added virtually nothing to its exterior except its most striking feature, a series of jagged, bombed-out windows that decorate the top of both the front- and rear-facing plaster facades like the eyes of a skull. One Saturday, he and a group of friends spent the day hacking away at the exterior with sledgehammers — by evening, they had four huge openings. Brandlhuber then glued glass on the inside of the openings, making them into functional windows. ‘‘I liked that the shape was made by the group and not the individual,’’ he says. ‘‘In architecture, the creative process is typically finished with the final drawing. Then you just execute it.’’ At night, when the building is lit from within, the structure appears both sinister and slightly otherworldly, a spaceship from the future made with the materials of Germany’s Modernist past. ➡︎

They reveal views not just to the lake on one side and an oak wood on the other, but also to its own brickwork which was built by “bricklayer apprentices from Mozambique or Vietnam who came to the GDR back then”, says Schneider, who is pleased that both the face and the history of the original building could be kept. ➡︎

The hammering functioned as a de facto Happening, an event with obvious references in the history of art and film. In the movie Themroc, the actor Michel Piccoli makes similar “openings” in his apartment. His neighbors imitate him, resulting in a vast, dark, orgiastic world where the holes in the walls signify the drives of an uncontrolled society that no longer accepts officially sanctioned boundaries between private and public, intimate and collective space, and the limits of the body. The Anti-Villa refers to a similar culture of uninhibited spatial decomposition. In a way, it’s not architecture. It’s orgytechture➡︎

We might even speak of the aesthetics of intensification: the space intensifies the sensation of seasonality. The water spout makes the rain louder, the stream of water over the roof thunders down with more volume when it lands on a gravel bed. Here, everything seems bigger. ➡︎


Extras

▶︎ euromaxx: The ‘Antivilla’ in Potsdam / DW / 2016


Sources

◼︎ A Former German Underwear Factory, Now an Elegant Concrete Villa / Gisela Williams / The New York Times / 2016

◼︎ Antivilla: Arno Brandlhuber's Provocative New Home / Luise Rellensman / Uncube / 2015

◼︎ Anti-Villa: ARNO BRANDLHUBER’s Thinking Model for a New 21st Century Architecture / Niklas Maak / 032c / 2015


adidas Running | UltraBOOST X FW17 | Greater Every Run / Sarah Chatfield / Iris / 2017

adidas Running | UltraBOOST X FW17 | Greater Every Run / Sarah Chatfield / Iris / 2017

Freunde von Freunden: Arno Brandlhuber / 2015

Freunde von Freunden: Arno Brandlhuber / 2015