Japanese Collection Ep.2: NA House by Sou Fujimoto / Vincent Hecht / 2012

Japanese Collection Ep.2: NA House by Sou Fujimoto / Vincent Hecht / 2012


Footnotes

The building is based on a thin, split-level steel frame and represents a fully realised version of a home without stairs. (In truth, there is still a group of steps, which has been treated as a piece of "furniture" that can be moved about and repositioned elsewhere, effectively creating the illusion of multiple interior pathways). As a result, every horizontal plane becomes a generic surface. Without a specifically defined function, they can be used as a desk, shelf, bed, chair, etc., extolling the Japanese custom of sitting and sleeping on the floor in a manner that is so pervasive and clear that, while requiring no lengthy description, gives free reign to the imagination. ➡︎

It's not easy to strip a house down to such a gossamer-thin structure, with no visible sign of the air-conditioning that makes this greenhouse of a building habitable at all. But beyond that, House NA makes a number of historical connections. In its ruthless abstraction and its challenges to everyday life, it harks back to Peter Eisenman's dwelling experiments of the 1970s, and it even goes beyond that so one can also see strong hints of Paul Rudolph's stylish brutalism, in particular his 1989 Modulightor apartments in New York – a similar study in highly compact, spatially complex living. ➡︎


Sources

◼︎ Tokyo's vertical thresholds #3: Sou Fujimoto / Roberto Zancan / Domus / 2011

◼︎ House NA by Sou Fujimoto / Douglas Murphy / ICON / 2011


End of an era / Monocle / 2015

End of an era / Monocle / 2015

Sneak peek at a skinny, multilevel & transparent Tokyo house / Fair Companies / 2016

Sneak peek at a skinny, multilevel & transparent Tokyo house / Fair Companies / 2016