Ten Miles High / Róisín Murphy / 2016

Ten Miles High / Róisín Murphy / 2016


Music affects everyone in a very intimate way. If I meet a painter they love music and they need music to paint, and same with a writer. Everything is about the basic structure of music as an extension of reason, so every architect loves music.

[...]

I was really into architecture as a teenager. I had gone out with an architect and we travelled around Europe looking at architecture. I got back into it over the last few years through social media groups and going around photographing buildings and sharing my thoughts – as they did likewise – and if you love architecture it can make you feel very good to be alive, you know? It is an extremely positive hobby because it is fuckin’ everywhere. It is so easy to not to look at it – to be oppressed by it – that actually once you turn your gaze on it it becomes something that you can enjoy, and something that doesn’t overpower you  as much as it doesn’t when you’re not taking any notes of it. ➡︎

This visual concept comes directly from my rather exuberant love of architecture, something I've had a passion for since my teenage years. I live in London and most of my days are spent marvelling at the ever-changing landscape. I photograph much of what I see. I engage in discussion on a couple of architectural-social-media platforms. All this means London as a shoot-location has been well scouted by me. But it's not just about buildings, I also find the transport infrastructure fascinating – the Tube, the Overground, the DLR and their stations became part of the video-art too. The desire is to show you how I see things in the here and now and to do so joyously. As far as connection to the track, I think it's asking you to elevate yourself stratospherically whilst keeping you feet firmly on the ground.

They know me now, the guys on the building-site around Tottenham Court Road and on several other sites in central London. I've been hanging around dressed in high vis trying to blend in. All the while I'm being surreptitiously filmed by a very small but quite miraculous digital camera. We are a small unit and light on our feet, we grab footage when and where we find it, without permission or permits. Although at first nobody knew what to make of this construction-woman dancing and singing at the edge of their turf, now they know me they just step out of the way and maybe throw their eyes up to heaven. The strange thing is people try not to look. I get on a bus singing and dancing and they all look away. ➡︎

The title is part of that as well, grabbing this Irish lyric [a folk song, popularised by The Dubliners] and putting it in big black letters on the front of an electronically produced record; there’s an irreverence to that. And the aesthetic started with me being really into architecture, with me saying: “If I want it to be about the moment, about the now and what I wanna show people is the present time and if it’s me that’s doing it, it’s me that’s directing the artwork and the video etc, then what I should try to do really is show people what I see through my eyes. That’s a simple thing! So what do I see? I’ll just step out on the street and I’ll show them what I see, what I’m looking at all the time, what I’m photographing all the time anyway”. I’m all the time on the travelling infrastructure of the city, all the time looking at buildings, and all the time navigating my way around. It’s amazing the way the city is so complicated and yet so well organised and simple, and I just float through it. It’s about that. A love affair with this town, in the last few years. So I thought, I’ll just show people what I see, trying to be very immediate in that way. ➡︎

Take Her Up to Monto picks up this thread of psychotic materialism more resolutely than any of her previous works, its slick and occasionally menacing sonic eccentricities suggesting an acceleration beyond the subtle insecurities of Toys’ weightless melancholy toward some fucked-up inhuman liberatory chaos ahead—music for Ballard’s High-Rise, with all the energetic pessimism and anticipation that suggests. ➡︎


Sources

◼︎ Mixing Architecture and Music: Róisín Murphy talks own biography and new album / Paul Thomas / NOTHING BUT HOPE AND PASSION / 2016

◼︎ Róisín Murphy 'Ten Miles High' by Róisín Murphy – now joins roster at Good Egg / David Knight / Promo News / 2016

◼︎ "I've always been in control": DiS Meets Róisín Murphy / Giuseppe Zevolli / Drowned in Sound / 2016

◼︎ Reviews: Róisín Murphy, Take Her Up to Monto / Kristian Brito / The Quietus / 2016


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